Open Source

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On his off time, Casey Shenk writes a blog and researches news items that spark public interest. When a cargo ship named the Baltic Venture is high-jacked on its way from Finland to Algeria carrying lumber, he posts his suspicions online: no ransom demands have been made, it occurred in the Baltic Sea, a rare location for piracy, and the Russian Navy dispatched five vessels for a rescue…all for some lumber. So begins M.M. Frick’s new book, Open Source, an ambitious and highly entertaining look into global politics and intrigue. In his blog, Shenk maintains that whatever the Baltic Venture is carrying, it’s most likely stolen and being shipped illegally. This straight talk is what catches the attention of Susan Williams, an analyst working for a corporation that analyzes media and predicts world developments. Both Shenk and Williams look at readily available and frequently overlooked information (open sources) and draw informed conclusions. They surmise that there may be a secret arms deal. They need to find the buyer who will lead them to the weapons’ destination. Others become aware of their investigation, and their lives depend on anticipating the next move of whoever is behind the arms deal. Frick’s social and political references are current – feelings from the Cold War are still brewing and the world climate is set at a constant paranoia.

Frick’s characters are authentic and likeable. Williams has everything to gain by cracking such a high profile case. Shenk is happy with the status quo and has nothing to gain other than to reveal the truth behind a possible conspiracy. The dialogue is believable and fast-paced. Readers learn how Frick’s characters tick from the inside out. Frick is a naval officer and his extensive knowledge of the Middle East and maritime piracy is evident in this thrilling book.


Reviewed By:

Author M. M. Frick
Star Count 5/5
Format Trade
Page Count 336 pages
Publisher CreateSpace
Publish Date 30-Jul-2010
ISBN 9781453719985
Amazon Buy this Book
Issue August 2011
Category Mystery, Crime & Thriller
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