Last Song and Dance

We rated this book:

$14.99


Christopher Woods has penned a curious yarn in the Last Song and Dance. The book is written in a unique style unlike any other. It addresses a chaotic set of contentious characters who dare to be noticed, each with an eagerness for confrontation. With wonderful black ink drawings that capture the mood of the characters of the story, the author paints an ominous narrative. Last Song can be compared to Sanctuary by Paul Monette for its imagery and imaginative style. Many of the illustrations feature symbolic references to the plot that add intrigue to the story, forcing you to reflect on the meaning of certain passages. Much of the narrative reads like dialogue, but conveys a meaning of reaching into the mind of the character. The storyline is complex, with a variety of characters who seem to share certain traits.

The storyline focuses on tested confrontations. Although these keep the reader busy, they add depth to the plot. It’s a little misdirected in places, giving the reader a chance to compare that part with other parts. This tends to function like a red herring in a mystery. You cannot tell if it’s a blooper or a ploy until you finish it. Sorry—no spoilers!

Christopher Woods does a fine job at depicting the characters with verbiage, the illustrations bringing them to life. The intricacy with which the characters are woven into the plot shows us only glimpses of what’s to come, kind of like a foreshadowing of events. The reader must do a lot of work to put the story together in his or her mind as he or she reads. This provides an overall aura of mystery, motivating the reader to keep turning the pages. And the text flows along fast, making it easy reading.

If you want to sit down and read something to contemplate and capture your attention, then you’ve come to the right work. Last Song kind of reads like a fairy tale or fable, yet some of the characters are using profanity that would not be appropriate for children under 18, and the characters appear to engage in behavior that would also not suit young readers.

Chris Hayden been working at City Book Review since 2012, so that makes him the keeper of knowledge. He manages the office and book reviewers (all 200 of them!), which is no small feat. If you’re looking at the book reviews here, you’re seeing them because he sent the books out for review. Without him, this place would fall apart, because no one else in the office knows how to use the postage machine. Two words: job security.


Reviewed By:

Author Christopher Woods
Star Count 5/5
Format Trade
Page Count 128 pages
Publisher Bookfuel
Publish Date 2017-Jun-15
ISBN 9781535600576
Amazon Buy this Book
Issue October 2017
Category Popular Fiction
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Reviews

  1. Christopher Woods

    Just want to thank D Wayne for the kind words. I appreciate that he was complimentary of the art work as Lawrence of Bookfuel did a great job with my visual designs. I’ve come to the conclusion that one reason this novel has sold rather poorly is that no one needs to read an “apocalyptic farce” (another reviewer’s opinion) when all one has to do these days is turn on the evening news or read newspaper headlines. Just the same, I hope anyone who reads this enjoys it and since I’ve included email address…. chriswoods502@gmail.com feel free to offer feedback pro or con. c

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